NLP anchors or NLP anchoring how and why do they work? (Neurolinguistic Programming-3)

NLP anchors or NLP anchoring how and why do they work? (Neurolinguistic Programming-3)

The NLP anchors or NLP anchoring can help us to improve our emotional results in different situations in which we are affected by stress, blockage, fear, and so on.

The inspiration came when we read an article about the reward system and memory. In  Neuroscience News, almost daily, I receive notifications of very interesting publications. I recently read an interesting summary entitled  Brain Prioritizes Most Rewarding Experiences When Storing Memories.

The original article they was referring to was, Retroactive and graded prioritization of memory by reward de Erin Kendall BraunG. Elliott Wimmer & Daphna Shohamy; Nature Communications volume 9, Article number: 4886 (2018).

We can approach the subject taking the NLP anchors or NLP anchoring as a common thread along the post. We can then go through the foundations of neuroscience, to finally reach the referred article. Continue reading “NLP anchors or NLP anchoring how and why do they work? (Neurolinguistic Programming-3)”

Hebb’s rule with an analogy. Psychology and neuroscience

Hebb’s rule or Hebb’s law or Hebbian theory is fundamental to understand the relationship between psychology and neuroscience. To approach it we will go back to the original work of Donald O. Hebb and, later on, we will explain it through an analogy that will facilitate our understanding.

Linking psychology and neuroscience thanks to Donald O. Hebb

To talk about psychology and neuroscience, with the purpose of explaining behaviour through its cerebral foundations, we need to go back to Donald O. Hebb.

Donald Hebb is the creator of the most mentioned ‘principle’ in psychobiology, or behavioural neuroscience.From the so-called Hebb’s law, or Hebb’s rule of the Hebbian learning (Hebb learning rule).We will see it through an analogy by the end of this post.

Before, it’s worth remembering that with  NeuroQuotient , starting from the cerebral basis of behaviour, we have a tool that makes accessible the relationship between psychology and neuroscience.In this way, we can apply neuroscience to the development of people in a practical and efficient way.

But, practicality, efficiency and accessibility, does not mean superficiality. For this reason, before going into the analogy it is worthwhile to visit the origins. To Donald Olding Hebb. In the same way that, when dealing with the model behind the DISC tool, we went to the original approach of William Moulton Marston.

Donald O. Hebb and his contribution

Donald Olding Hebb (1904-1985) was a Canadian psychologist pioneer of neuropsychology (of the study of the relationship between psychology and neuroscience).

His most important contribution is condensed in the book, The Organization of Behavior: A Neuropsychological Theory , John Willey and Sons (1949).

The book ‘The Organization of Behavior’ gives us a theory about behaviour, based on the physiology of the nervous system. It makes an important attempt to find the common between neurological and psychological conceptions.

Hebb says to us: “One objective of this book is to present a theory of behaviour for the consideration of psychologists. But another objective is to pursue a common basis with anatomists, physiologists and neurologists (now, we could group them as neuroscientists).We show how psychological theory is related to their problems and, at the same time, make them contribute to this theory ”

He adds, too, that “the problem of understanding behaviour is to understand the total action of the nervous system, and vice versa.”

In his purpose to build bridges between psychology and neuroscience (incipient then), in 1944 he came in contact with Rafael Lorente de Nó (a Spanish researcher, a disciple of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, based in the USA).Hebb based part of his theory on the works on the ‘sensory loops of Lorente de Nó’.

The Hebb’s principle or Hebb’s rule

Hebb says that “when the axon of a cell A is close enough to excite a B cell and takes part on its activation in a repetitive and persistent way, some type of growth process or metabolic change takes place in one or both cells, so that increases the efficiency of cell A in the activation of B “.

‘neurons that fire together wire together’

It is customary to be summarized as “neurons that fire together wire together”.That is, the simultaneous activation of nearby neurons leads to an increase in the strength of synaptic connection between them.

It is important to note that the neurons must be previously connected, sufficiently close to one another, so that the synapse can be reinforced.

At early 1970s, LTP (long term potentiation) was discovered, which confirmed Hebb’s theory.It was demonstrated that morphological changes take place, splitting into the receptor dendrites of the hippocampus, which reinforce the synaptic connection.

In short, Hebb’s principle is fundamental for the relationship between psychology and neuroscience, since it provides a general framework for relating learning and behaviour with neural networks.

The analogy. At last!

70 years after the Hebb’s theory, the relationship between psychology and neuroscience is out of the question.It is very clear that behaviour originates in the brain and is based on neural networks or patterns.

Let’s see now how we can explain Hebb’s principle through an analogy.

The grooves on a hill that get deeper as more water flows down them, help us visualize Hebb’s principle and its relation to behaviour.

Imagine a small artificial hill of earth (Fig. 1).

In it there are some small grooves (Fig. 1. left) that would be equivalent to the pre-existing inactive synapses.

When it rains with repetition and persistence, some of these grooves become deeper and the water descends mainly through them (Fig. 1. right). Similarly, some pre-existing synaptic connections when activated, with their use, become stronger. The assembly of several strongly connected neurons becomes the basis of a learning or habit.

psychology and neuroscience
Fig1 Some of the small furrows on the left, with rain, with use, become large furrows where the water goes down.

In the Neuroquotient context, we call neuro-behaviours to the habits, learnings or, better, behaviour patterns: brain connections that give rise to a complex behavior (doing, thinking and feeling) that is repeated more likely and easier.

When we conduct ourselves (thinking, doing, feeling) in a certain way, the underlying neuronal connections are activated and reinforced.   In this way, the frequency and intensity of the corresponding behaviour increases.

Thus, the behaviour is based on some powerful neuronal connections, for this reason it is difficult to change it.Coming back to the analogy, the deeper the grooves are, the more likely it is that water descends through them.

If the neuro-behaviours bring us little or no satisfaction, if they limit us, it is worth changing them

It is very good of having brain patterns that guide our complex behaviour; our way of thinking and feeling.Without them we would have to start from scratch every day.

But, is it, always, ok?Well, it depends on the results (satisfaction) that are derived from our behaviour. It depends on where it goes to stop the water from the grooves.

Remember that the neuroquotient tool helps us to become aware of when it is worthwhile to insist on the groove, or if it is worth changing. We become more aware of our Efficiencies (neuro-behaviours with satisfactory results) and Limitations (patterns that do not contribute to our satisfaction).

And yes, of course, when a neuro behaviour is limiting us, then it is worth changing it

Is it possible to do it?  And if is it possible, how?

But, this we will deal with in some post in the future.

The DISC personality test and NeuroQuotient. Similarities and differences.

It is likely that we are here looking for information about the DISC personality test. But, how we are attracted by innovation, we can also take the opportunity to learn about NeuroQuotient. The neuro tool that allows to apply neuroscience to coaching and people development in a practical and efficient way.

Anyway, if your interest does not go beyond the DISC personality test, you will find more information in this same blog – ” DISC model and DISC personality assessment tools for development (tools 5)”

In the current post we compare NeuroQuotient with the DISC personality test. So, we can see the most outstanding features of both tools.

Although, the best way to know NeuroQuotient, is to sign up for one of the free online workshops. And to continue with the Certification to be able to use the neuro tool to its full potential.

But, now, let’s follow another approach. We will take as reference the DISC personality test and we will compare it with NeuroQuotient in certain relevant aspects, seeing similarities and differences. The DISC personality test is the most widely used coaching and leadership development tool. We have already seen it in this blog.

Continue reading “The DISC personality test and NeuroQuotient. Similarities and differences.”