Neuroscience and coaching. Neurocoaching for leadership – NeuroQuotient®

Being able to connect neuroscience and coaching is important for the people development, especially of the leadership. So, we can practice neurocoaching. We reviewed the path that led us to create NeuroQuotient®, the tool that makes it possible in a practical and efficient way. A path with high expectation, false myths, some frustration and, since a long time, with results.

A little history to place us.

Since the end of the last century advances in the understanding of the human brain and its relationship with behavior are being exponential. That is why, in the 21st century, it is essential to take advantage of this knowledge for people development. Therefore, the connection between neuroscience and coaching and leadership development is becoming more important.  By creating NeuroQuotient® we want to do it more understandable and practical.

Neuroimaging techniques such as fMRI (functional nuclear magnetic resonance) allow us to observe which brain centers are activated when we perform a certain task. From here, neuroeconomics and neuromarketing have been developed, for example. In both cases we try to answer the question: what happens in the brain when we make decisions?

Anyway, these studies do nothing more than confirm the previous work, of psychobiology, carried out in laboratory animals. This is because the brain structures are very well preserved from one species to another. Our brain is not very different from that of a guinea pig. Except for the prefrontal cortex (CPF), naturally. The motivational and memory limbic centers are similar. The neuroimaging techniques have allowed to observe in a non-invasive way the connection of these centers with the PFC.

Do not confuse the neuroscience and coaching binomial with neurolinguistic programming (NLP)

It is important to make clear that when talking about neuroscience and coaching, about neurocoaching, we are not referring to NLP (neurolinguistic programming) applied to the people development.

John Grinder and Richard Bandler, the creators of NLP, were successful to use the word ‘neuro’ to name the result of their work. And it is that the ‘neuro’ attracts, it helps to sell. However, NLP is not neuroscience. But, taking advantage of its slipstream, a first version of neuromarketing and a first neurocoaching emerged. More than one has signed up for NLP looking for neuroscience, right?

With this we do not say that NLP is not useful to connect neuroscience and coaching. Once the cerebral bases of behavior are understood, NLP techniques can be very useful for the leadership development.

Our approach to neuroscience and coaching.

In 2001, 19 years ago, we began our journey as coaching professionals and, simultaneously, in NLP. Since then we were looking for the connection between neuroscience and coaching, the neurocoaching, thinking about applying it to the leadership development.

On this path there are some culminating points, which are not the final ones, which are a master’s degree in neuroscience (2009-2010) and the creation of NeuroQuotient (2010-2103). Anyway, we want to point out some milestones, in the form of books, that we now remember as important and that can help us in this connection between coaching and neuroscience and leadership development. Above all, in what we consider key: the need to be able to understand the brain foundations of human behavior; and the connection of the limbic centers with the prefrontal cortex.

Although, these books are only references that have been helping us to confirm that we were on the right track. Actually, the information we used for the creation of NeuroQuotient were basic neuroscience articles and reviews. Case apart is the book,

James J. Gross (editor). Habdbook of Emotion Regulation. The Guilford Press, 2007

that we can define as a great compilation of reviews and articles that was essential in the generation of NeuroQuotient®.

As for the books, in order of reading.

Nolasc Acarín. El cerebro del rey. Una introducción apasionante a la conducta humana. RBA libros SBA, Barcelona 2001

Joe Dispenza. Evolve your brain, 2008

David Rock. Your brain at work. Strategies for overcoming distraction, regaining focus and working smarter all day allong. Harper Collins Publishers, 2008

Amy Brann. Make Your Brain Work. How to maximaze Your Efficiency, Productivity and Effectiviness. Kogan Page Limited, 2013

Joaquín M. Fuster. The Neuroscience of Freedom and Creativity. Cambridge University Press, 2013

and, finally, one that we discovered just when writing this post. by its title it is the most pertinent to establish the nexus between neuroscience and coaching,

Amy Brann. Neuroscience for Coaches. How to Use the Latest Insights for the Benefit of Your Clients. Kogan Page, 2017

This book does not fall into our hands until now, because since 2013 we have been using NeuroQuotient®  to make the conection between neuroscience and coaching for the development of leadership. But, sure, we will learn a lot from it.

A little dopamine and a lot of serotonin.

When we talk about neuroscience and coaching, it is very likely that the first thing that comes to mind are neurotransmitters. The molecules that facilitate the connection between neurons in neuronal synapses.

If we did a survey we can be sure that the neurotransmitters most cited would be serotonin and dopamine. Then, perhaps, oxytocin and adrenaline, although these two are more neurohormones than neurotransmitters.

And this, why? Well, because both with dopamine, and serotonin the simple word conveys a meaning to us. We do not have to study hard. Their names suggest their functionality. An erroneous assumption, but it seems that we understand it. Perhaps other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate or GABA or acetylcholine, are more important, but at the outset, they do not tell us anything directly.

dopamine sounds like ‘dopping’ and pleasure. serotonin to tranquility. there we have another case of marketing success, how the nlp. especially, with serotonin.

Everything is much more complicated. the brain has between 50 and 100 billion neurons!

And for coaching and neuroscience, the direct and easy path (our mind seeks simplicity) is to think that it can be enough to increase dopamine and serotonin. The connection between coaching and neuroscience would thus become almost pharmacological. Take a pill and you are done!

But it is much more complicated. The brain has between 50 and 100 billion neurons. Of dopamine there are many types of receptors, for instance.

On the other hand, dopamine starts the reward system, but does not generate pleasure. It is part of the motivation process of behaviors that can generate pleasure.

For example, when a dog perceives a bone, its spices memory indicates that it is a signal of reward. Dopamine is in the motivation of action to eat the bone, not in pleasure (endorphins are responsible for this). If the bone is poisoned the result will not be exactly pleasant.

Do not forget, in addition, that dopamine is also part of the mesocortical pathway of the reward system. This way favors the focus of attention towards the ‘object of desire’ that has awakened the reward system.

Not always a lot of serotonin is suitable.

On the other hand, the word serotonin transmits serenity. In addition, we are prescribed serotonin enhancers (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRI) to treat depression. Fuoxetine (Prozac), for example.

However, they do not tell us the paradox of serotonin.

They do not explain to us that people genetically more prone to depression have less effective serotonin reuptakers. That is, they have more free serotonin. We finally understood it, after giving it many laps, thanks de Gordon Book chapter 6 “ James J. Gross (editor). Habdbook of Emotion Regulation. The Guilford Press, 2007. (On “Genetics of Emotion Regulation” pag. 110 and “the 5-HTTLPR-SSRI Paradox pag. 124 (Ahmad R. Hariri, Erika E. Forbes)”.

So, everything is much more complicated! It is not enough to identify the role of some key neuro transmitters! It is not easy to connect neuroscience and coaching for leadership development. For this reason, to simplify it, with NeuroQuotient® we identify what is most relevant within this complexity.

Facilitate awareness. A very important coaching competence. How to enhance it with coaching and neuroscience, with neurocoaching?

Creating Awareness is the 8th coaching competence according to the ICF. They define it like: ‘Integrating and accurately evaluating multiple sources of information and making interpretations that help the client to gain awareness and thereby achieve agreed-upon results’.

And we ask ourselves, how could we use the connection between neuroscience and coaching to facilitate awareness?

In coaching, especially when it comes to leadership development, tools are used to facilitate awareness. Some are about the personality and quite a few of them we have seen in this blog. DISC, MBTI, Discovery Insights, Enneagram, Only in DISC, William Moulton Marston, its creator, thought about a far connection with the neuroscience.

So, we proposed, at the beginning of 2009, to create a tool to connect coaching and neuroscience.

For this it was essential to have clear the fundamentals of neuroscience. Then, try to identify what is key, to be able to define a simple structure (a model) that will sustain the relationship between brain and behavior.

The first point was addressed with a master’s degree in Psychobiology and Cognitive Neuroscience. The second, studying basic neuroscience, trying to find the fundamental brain systems that simplify complexity.

And, at the end of 2011 many ideas of what we had studied from previous years, not only of neuroscience, crystallized in a first structure for the model. (The key elements for this ‘fusion’ of ideas will be discussed in another post).

What does NeuroQuotient® bring us in the neuroscience and coaching connection?

In mid-2014 the web application was running. With it, those of us dedicated to the development of people, especially of the leadership, can connect neuroscience and coaching. After Certifying in NeuroQuotient®, we can send questionnaires to clients and then interpret the results and prepare the reports, which are derived from their answers.

The main contributions of NeuroQuotient can be seen on this website or participating in one of the free introductory workshops). Or, better, contact us and we will provide you with the information you require (+ info).

Anyway, the fundamental contribution is that it helps us connect neuroscience and coaching. NeuroQuotient is a tool based on neuroscience and with a coaching approach.

It facilitates a quick awareness of the brain processes that help each one to satisfaction and leadership.

The customers answer about their current and desired status. Comparing both, they easily perceive which is the priority where to focus his action for a more efficient development.

NeuroQuotient® is the neuro tool of the coach to boost better, faster and easier the satisfaction of their clients.

Neuroscience and coaching. Neurocoaching for leadership - NeuroQuotient
Fig 1. NeuroQuotient® graphics. Efficacies (color) and Limitations (gray). People want to increase Efficiencies and decrease Limitations

Insights Discovery. Color Personality Test. (Coaching Tools 8)

The Insights Discovery, the color personality test, is one of the most complete personality tools for the leadership development and relationships development in companies.

Our purpose, as in other cases, is to understand its foundations and assess its suitability to be used in coaching. We include it in the coaching tools series because starts with the self-knowledge and self-awareness. However, a priori, its greatest usefulness seems to be in the development of the relationships and the leadership.

It is popularly known as ‘the test of colors’ or ‘the color personality test’. In our work as consultants it is easy to know if in a company they have had a workshop using the Insights Discovery. Sooner rather than later, someone, referring to another person, says: ‘Ah, this person do this because is blue (or red or green, or yellow)’.

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Mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience. Improve resilience and measure it with NeuroQuotient®.

We connect mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience. Also, meditation, neuroscience and resilience. The practice of mindfulness has positive effects on the brain. One of them is that resilience improves by practicing mindfulness and meditation. We introduce the resilience indices of NeuroQuotient®.The book Altered Traits. Science Reveals how Meditation Changes your Mind, Brain and Body by Daniel Goleman and Richard J. Davidson was very helpful to explain the connection.

Introduction.

NeuroQuotient® is a model and a tool that helps us understand the neuroscience of behavior. In this case it will be useful to see the relationship between mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience (and meditation, neuroscience and resilience). Specifically to see the effect that mindfulness practice has on the brain and how it favors resilience.

Behind our behavior there are patterns that are sustained by brain structures (centers and neuronal pathways). In another post we explain how these patterns are created and reinforced through the principle of Donald Hebb.

When the patterns are very marked, they can become ‘behavior’ traits, (even personality traits) that are very characteristic of each person.

Daniel Goleman and Richard J. Davidson, in their book:Altered Traits. Science Reveals how Meditation Changes your Mind, Brain and Body’, they tell us that the practice of meditation helps us modify some of these ‘traits’.

From NeuroQuotient®, we believe that, the practice of mindfulness and meditation helps us, indeed, to modify brain patterns. In addition, we are convinced that the main ‘traits’ that are modified contribute to improved resilience. NeuroQuotient® allows us to measure progress in these traits through, as we will see, the resilience indices.

We will connect, then, mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience, through NeuroQuotient® and its resilience indices. The ideas of the book by Goleman and Davidson will be useful to confirm how is this connection between mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience.

Let’s start by briefly describing what we mean by some concepts such as resilience, meditation, mindfulness and neuroscience. And a little more about NeuroQuotient®.

Resilience

Resilience at work means: pressure tolerance, fatigue resistance, ability to concentrate, etc. It has more to do with the person himself than with the events and inputs of the environment.

Resilience refers, in general, to the ability of human beings to adapt successfully to adverse situations. But, at the day-to-day level at work we don’t need to look for great adversities. We can talk about ‘pressure tolerance’, ‘fatigue resistance’, ‘ability to stay focused and keeping the attention span, etc. Additionally, high resilience corresponds to a good level of self-leadership, of self-management.

In all these cases, it is the person himself, rather than the signals and stressors of the environment, that has the greatest influence. It’s about how you perceive, react and feel in different situations.

Meditation, mindfulness and neuroscience.

With meditation we refer to the ancient Eastern tradition. With Mindfulness (full awareness of the present moment) we refer to the practical adaptation of meditation to the Western world, and with its application on a daily basis and at work.

From now on, although Goleman and Davidson refer more to meditation, we will remain with mindfulness and neuroscience. Above all, for the practical vocation that mindfulness has. In today’s fast and demanding world, few people have time for a deep practice of meditation. However, it is accessible to incorporate informal mindfulness exercises on a day-to-day basis that result in improved resilience.

So far, we have talked about mindfulness and neuroscience, and meditation and neuroscience, interchangeably. From here, we will stay with mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience.

A little more about NeuroQuotient®

As we have said, in NeuroQuotient® we deal with the behavior and the brain patterns on which it is based. We call them neuro behaviors.

With NeuroQuotient®, after answering a questionnaire, we have a snapshot of a time in the person’s life (current state) regarding their most frequent neuro behaviors. We differentiate between efficient neuro behaviors (in color in the graph) and limiting neuro behaviors (in gray). The effective ones bring satisfaction to the person. The limiters do not provide good emotional results.

The higher the efficiencies and the lower the limitations are, the higher the level of self-leadership. We measure the level of self-leadership with the NQ index.

The NQ index correlates very well with the scale Self-Directedness of the TCI-R model of Dr. Robert Cloninger.

Mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience
Fig 1. We want to intensify the efficient patterns (neuro behaviors) and weaken the limiting ones, to increase our satisfaction (emotional results).

With mindfulness practice, neuro behaviors are modified, and people’s satisfaction and resilience improve. The connection between mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience is actual and effective.

From the beginning we observed that development efforts were worth it. The most evolved people, with better self-leadership, told us: ‘Some time ago (one, two, three, years) I would not have answered in the same way; my limitations would have been much higher.

And this answer was independent of the development method used. From simple awareness, or coaching, or psychotherapy, or meditation, etc. Meditation and mindfulness were one of the paths. The most effective, we believe.

In short, with the development process, there had been a change in the neuro behaviors, in the brain patterns, of the person.

And, of course, when these new behavior patterns persist beyond the old ones that limited the person’s satisfaction, we can talk about modified traits, as a result of the development process.

NeuroQuotient® Resilience Indices

The dimensions of resilience in NeuroQuotient® are the reverse of the limitations. Low limitation means a high dimension of resilience.

And how do we connect NeuroQuotient® with resilience?

In a very simple way. When the limitations in NeuroQuotient® are low, the ability to respond to adverse situations (or perceived as such) is better. Also, very important! Greater is the ability not to amplify the adverse environmental signals. That is, with low limitations, the greater the resilience.

Hence the reverse of the limitations are the dimensions of resilience. We named them this way:
rA1 – management of attention and impulsiveness.
rA2 – management of anger (and empathy).
rI1 – management of stress.
rI2 – management of self-thinking (and self-esteem).

In Fig 2 are the graphs for two real cases with different levels of resilience according to NeuroQuotient®.

Let’s describe these resilience indices. At same time we will refer to some of the ´Altered Traits´ the result of the practice of meditation and mindfulness, as Goleman and Davidson tell us. In this way, we can connect mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience.

Mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience
Fig 2. Values of the resilience dimensions according to NeuroQuotient® for two real cases. Left. Low resilience (current state Fig1). Right. Remarkable level of resilience. The 3 corresponds to the average. From 0 to 6, – / + 3 standard deviations
rA1 – management of attention and impulsiveness.

Modified traits related to improved concentration and attention span, and with the resilience dimension rA1.

Some of the altered traits, according to Goleman and Davidson, refer to a better attention, to a greater focus, to decrease the tendency of the mind to wander, to control the response to external distraction signals (blinks), to potentiation of working memory, etc.

That is, they are related to the resilience dimension rA1. Although in rA1 we also include other neuro behaviors. Brain patterns that have to do with low impulsivity, with not being carried away by the illusion of the moment and / or by the search for immediate reward. Also, with not creating one-self unrealistic expectations.

In general, it is an optimal management of the reward system in its prefrontal (attention, concentration) and limbic (motivation) pathways. We believe that the practice of mindfulness is positive for both aspects. A key element in the relationship mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience.

When dealing about attention and focus, Goleman and Davidson talk about multitasking. For them the multitasking brain does not exist, but it is connecting, and disconnecting quickly from one task to another. With this premise, it is obvious that people with a tendency to multitasking are more easily distracted.

Attention is essential in all functions of the prefrontal cortex, for this reason, mindfulness also improves working memory.

rI1- management of stress and rA2 – management of anger (and empathy).

Modified traits related to reduced activation of the amygdala (threat system, fear) and stress. Also, with the ability to manage fear and the amygdala with the PFC (prefrontal cortex). Resilience dimensions rI1 and rI2.

Other modified features, according to Goleman and Davidson have to do with a lower reactivity of the amygdala (threat system center in the brain) to stress and a greater ability to manage it from the PFC (prefrontal cortex).

From there we are going to the resilience dimensions rA2 and rI1. Behind them is, indeed, the system of threats or fear, with the amygdala as the fundamental brain center. After the amygdala of an animal is activated, in response to a threat of the environment, the stress (adrenaline) is switch on (in the version ‘fight’ or ‘flight’).

But, humans, we can amplify these signals. We can even imagine them only with our thoughts. But, also, we can stop them with the same PFC (prefrontal cortex). When we dealt about stress we saw the prefrontal connection with the intercalated GABA cells (CIT) that calm down the amygdala.

If we are able to manage our internal stress, and not increase it by worrying, the resilience index rI1 will be high.

If we manage the externalization of stress, curbing our anger and aggressiveness, the rA2 resilience index will also be high.

In addition, with respect to rA2, there is another modified feature. From meditation and mindfulness, there is a better connectivity of the empathy circuit.

We are more prepared to feel the negative effect on others when we expel our stress towards them. In addition, in this case it is the oxytocin that calms the amygdala by acting on the interspersed GABA neurons.

rI2 – management of self-thinking (and self-esteem).

With meditation and mindfulness, the default network related to rumination and depression, and the tendency to think negative about oneself, also becomes less active. The resilience dimension rI2 is increased.

Finally, but very important, is the rI2 resilience dimension.

When it is low, it includes a high tendency to ‘rumination’. To stay blocked by turning to negative thoughts about ourselves and to blame ourselves.

This neuro behavior can be a symptom of major depression. In a depressive state there is absence of motivation, energy is very low and self-esteem is negatively affected. Resilience is zero. The high rI2 dimension means the opposite: motivation, energy and self-esteem.

It is well described that the circuit default network ’brain circuit is involved in rumination.

Well, Goleman and Davidson, tell us that with meditation the dorsolateral prefrontal connection that inhibits the default network is reinforced. Another key relationship between mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience.

Persist in practice!

With meditation and mindfulness, the altered traits appear soon, but it is necessary to persist in practice so that they consolidate and endure. With NeuroQuotient® we measure progress!

Finally, keep in mind that, as Goleman and Davidson say, the altered traits arise with little need for practice, but it is necessary to persist in it to last.

It is necessary to consolidate the new neuronal pathways to prevail over the previous ones. This tells us the Hebb principle we quoted at the beginning. Simple, but very important to understand the connection between mindfulness, neuroscience and resilience.

It is necessary to persist in practicing mindfulness. If we abandon, the previous patterns will reappear as stronger than the new ones created, and reinforced, with the practice of mindfulness.

On the other hand, with NeuroQuotient® we can track to measure progress in resilience indices.

The DISC personality test and NeuroQuotient. Similarities and differences.

It is likely that we are here looking for information about the DISC personality test. But, how we are attracted by innovation, we can also take the opportunity to learn about NeuroQuotient. The neuro tool that allows to apply neuroscience to coaching and people development in a practical and efficient way.

Anyway, if your interest does not go beyond the DISC personality test, you will find more information in this same blog – ” DISC model and DISC personality assessment tools for development (tools 5)”

In the current post we compare NeuroQuotient with the DISC personality test. So, we can see the most outstanding features of both tools.

Although, the best way to know NeuroQuotient, is to sign up for one of the free online workshops. And to continue with the Certification to be able to use the neuro tool to its full potential.

But, now, let’s follow another approach. We will take as reference the DISC personality test and we will compare it with NeuroQuotient in certain relevant aspects, seeing similarities and differences. The DISC personality test is the most widely used coaching and leadership development tool. We have already seen it in this blog.

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The NLP Time line (Neuroscience and NLP series – 1)

The NLP time line we could say that is the result of how we structure the perception of time in the brain.

How can the NLP time line help us?What is our type of the NLP time line?Is it worth changing it?

Neuroscience and NLP series – Neuro-linguistic Programming

Some time ago I had a lot of interest in approaching the NLP Time Line. It is a good topic to start a series of articles relating NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) with neuroscience and the fundamentals of behaviour in the brain.

NLP talks about brain software, about mental programs. Would it be interesting to connect this software with the hardware? That is, to link the programs with the brain substrates; with neuroscience. In this way, we could better understand the brain foundations of behaviour.

This is something that Neuroquotient® can do for us.To see it, we will start, then, by connecting the NLP time line with the brain.

A model within NLP. The NLP Time line

We could say that Neurolinguistic Programming is constituted by a series of techniques and models for personal development and improvement.Techniques derived from modeling experts with special success in these fields.

One of these models and / or techniques is the NLP Time line.

In a simple way, the NLP time line deals with how the brain organizes events (past, present and future).If the human brain can remember, perceive and imagine, it must somehow organize itself to distinguish one thing from another.

Our first foray into NLP in 2001 (just before training as a Practitioner) was through the book ‘ Introduction to NLP’ by Joseph O’Connor and John Seymour . They make reference to the NLP time line quoting the book ‘ Time line Therapy and the Basis of Personallity ‘ by Tad James and Wyatt Woodsmall.

An exercise to determine the type of our NLP Time line

Then, in the NLP workshop, they asked us to conduct an exercise to help us figure out our NLP Time line.

The exercise is about remembering and imagine several situations and then they try to see where our images are placed in the space outside us.

A guide to find these pictures in our memory and imagination can be as follows:

‘Remember a breakfast when you went to the elementary school.

Then, remember a breakfast during the last holidays

Think of breakfast this morning.

Imagine having a breakfast during the next holidays.

Finally, imagine a breakfast when you are very old, after retiring.

It is very likely that for each situation you see an image, where are these images placed?

Before going on reading, we could spend some time doing this exercise.In this way we won’t be conditioned by the explanations that follow.The exercise will be useful to know in what type of the NLP time line we are.

Doing the previous exercise and after reading the text that follows, we can answer the question What type of the NLP time line we get closer?

The two most frequent types of the NLP time lines: ‘through time’ and ‘in time’

Tad James describes two most common types of NLP time line:

‘through time’ and ‘in time’

PNL y la linea del tiempo
Left ‘through time’: projecting and perceiving past present and future at the same time. Right ‘in time’ the moment in which the mind is focused (past, present or future) in the foreground prevents perceiving the rest.

In the first case (‘through time’) people perceive the images forming a more or less opened parable. With the present in front, and near, of the person, the past to the left and the future to the right.Past and future more distant the further away the present moment is.

In the second case (‘in time’) the future is what we can perceive in front and the past behind.

Since the first time I did the exercise, we have asked many people around us to do it.We find two types of perceptions of the NLP time line that, we might say, are very majority.

A perception, ‘through time’, exactly as described by Tad James. (‘over time’)Images in front of the person, arranged along a parabola.

And another perception when people can only see an image at the same time and in front of us. As if we had a collection of photos and we were seeing them one by one. The one in view hides the others. It is not identical to what Tad James describes, but we will call this type of perception in the same way, ‘in time’.

Influence on behaviour of the time perception according the NLP time line.

Do the types of time perception regarding the NLP time line influence the way each person behaves?

We could say, without being afraid to be wrong, that yes.

We can observe that people with perception ‘through time’ have a greater tendency to structure thoughts and to establish causal connections (influence of the past, in the present and the future).They tend to plan and usually have a high motivation for studying and learning.It seems logical, learning helps to feel prepared to face the uncertainty of the future.

Conversely, people with perception ‘in time’, have a higher focus to the present and they easily jump from one idea to another, with a tendency to lateral thinking. They are more motivated by creative tasks and by the variety of them.In addition, they express their thoughts more spontaneously.

Now we can check if our neuro behaviours are according with the type of the NLP time line that we have identified with the previous exercise.

From now on we can open many questions up:

What are the brain fundamentals of the NLP time line?

What type is better for each one of us?Is it worth changing?

How could we improve, if we believe it necessary?

In the next post we can see the possible answers that we can find to move forward together.

Coaching tools for the leadership development

DISC, Insights discovery, MBTI, etc.

Introduction. Personality models of personality ‘types’ and ‘traits’

Herramientas de coaching

Which tool is more helpful for you to accompany the client’s development?

During the following articles we will be commenting on different coaching tools typically used in the accompaniment towards personal improvement. Either to facilitate self-knowledge or awareness of strengths and improvement opportunities; and the focusing on development processes.

Continue reading “Coaching tools for the leadership development”